The Starbucks Foundation awards $1.5M in Neighborhood Grants to advance racial equity


In June 2020, The Starbucks Foundation committed $1 million in Neighborhood Grants to promote racial equity and create more inclusive communities.

Since then, The Starbucks Foundation has invited experts from the philanthropic, nonprofit and civil rights sectors to help inform the identification and selection process of the nonprofit organizations. These grants are focused on supporting organizations that are Black-led and/or serve Black and Indigenous communities and are dedicated to promoting economic mobility and opportunity, health and social services and youth. With that criteria in mind, thousands of partners nominated an organization advancing racial equity in their community or voted on nonprofits suggested by others. Based on the volume of partner engagement in this round, The Starbucks Foundation has awarded an additional $500,000, for a total of $1.5 million in Neighborhood Grants awarded to more than 400 nonprofit organizations across the U.S.

View the full list of selected grant recipients here.

Neighborhood Grants are intended to help build sustained local impact and inspire increased partner volunteerism with nonprofit organizations that work in our communities. Since the program launched in September 2019, thousands of Starbucks partners have participated in the giving program by nominating organizations, helping The Starbucks Foundation award nearly 2,000 grants amounting to nearly $4 million to nonprofits across the U.S. and Canada.


About The Starbucks Foundation

The Starbucks Foundation strengthens humanity by transforming lives across the world, with a focus on enabling community resiliency and prosperity and uplifting communities affected by disaster. Established in 1997, The Starbucks Foundation is a Section 501(c)(3) charitable organization under U.S. law.  Neighborhood Grant recipients are nominated by Starbucks partners and final decisions are made by The Starbucks Foundation based on eligibility criteria. Click here to learn more.